Welcome to Melbourne – Consul General of Canada in Sydney, Andre Francois Giroux

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The Canadian Australian Chamber of Commerce welcomed the Consul General of Canada in Sydney, Andre Francois Giroux, and the Consul and Senior Trade Commissioner, Sarah Quigley to two events in Melbourne in May to discuss COVID-19, international trade and expanding into new markets. Hosted by Minter Ellison, the events were the first held in person by the CACC since the start of the pandemic and were an opportunity for business discussions and networking. Consul General Giroux said coming to Australia had been one of the best moves for his family. “When I go home each night to see big smiling faces with everyone so grateful and happy to be here, it really reinforces how wonderful it is to be in Australia,” he said. Consul General Giroux said while it was sometimes easy to forget about COVID-19 in Australia, given the remarkable efforts that had been achieved in controlling the virus, watching the news was a stark reminder that other countries were not fairing so well. Yet he said the importance of international trade to the Australian market meant the border could not stay closed forever. “There will be a time when Australia needs to open its border because international trade is such an important part of its economy. In Canada, two thirds of its economy rests with international trade and it is a similar reality for Australia,” he said. “The Canadian Government is working really hard to ensure we have a post-COVID recovery that rests on the principles of rules-based trade. We have a number of free trade agreements in place, which are crucial to ensuring the free flow of Canadian goods and services to other parts of the world.” When it came to the role of the Canadian Commission in Sydney and the Canadian High Commission in Canberra, Consul...

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Welcome To Australia, Canadian Consul and Senior Trade Commissioner Sarah Quigley

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Consul and Senior Trade Commissioner Sarah Quigley took up her posting in Australia in January 2020, just as the first COVID-19 cases emerged in Australia. She relocated first to Canberra and then Sydney from Vancouver, with her New Zealand-born husband and two young children. Despite arriving in Australia during a difficult time, Ms Quigley said she loved the beauty of the country and the attitude of the people. “I obviously came to Australia at a challenging time, amidst the bushfires and then COVID-19, and I quickly gained an understanding of the resilience and fortitude of Australians, qualities which are shared by Canadians.” As Senior Trade Commissioner, her role is to lead the trade team in Australia and advise on matters of trade promotion and investment to help Canadian businesses grow in Australia by connecting them with funding, support and opportunities. Conversely, she helps Australian businesses invest and expand in Canada. The trade team consists of 14 trade commissioners and trade commissioner assistants across Australia. “We help businesses export abroad by providing them information on the sector, product or service in Australia they are involved in,” Ms Quigley said. “We provide practical exporting assistance to businesses, helping them get their product from point A to point B. We also support businesses through programs like CanExport, which provides financial assistance to businesses looking to break into new markets.” “We provide problem solving assistance in helping businesses assess their potential or provide business contacts here in Australia.” “Another important service we provide is market access, so if businesses are having trouble in a particular sector, for example, navigating a regulatory issue, we work with these businesses to help represent their needs.” She said being a Senior Trade Commissioner was incredibly interesting and rewarding. “The best part about the role is meeting with Canadian companies....

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Future of Business – A Global Outlook for Australia & Canada

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As anyone in business knows, the past year has challenged us in ways we could not have conceived. The COVID-19 pandemic plunged us into the great unknown. It forced us to change direction rapidly while under enormous pressure, to push boundaries and take risks in order to keep businesses running. Despite the challenges, many businesses are emerging from the other side. So, what lies ahead? Canadian and Australian economists contemplated this question at the Future of Business online webinar, hosted by the CACC in February. PWC Australia Managing Partner and CACC board member Mike McGrath said we were still living in uncertain times and grappling with operating in a COVID-normal world. “Deadlines have come and gone, we’ve had lockdowns – both in Australia and in Canada – and vaccination programs are gradually rolling out,” he said. “There have been government stimulus packages and impacts on strategies and purpose. Businesses have tried to hold onto employees and continue their core functions. We’ve seen people transition to working from home and we’ve seen a change in social sentiment as people have reflected on what is important in life. In this context, we want to look at the economic outlook and recovery and where businesses go from here.” Managing Director and Chief Economist for RBC Capital Markets Su-Lin Ong said the pandemic had helped businesses realise the importance of digitisation and research and development. “Businesses that have had digitalisation strategies in place have been able to react quickly and keep businesses going,” she said. “We are going to see more of this in the months and years ahead.” Yet, for many of us who have been working at home for the better part of a year, human connection has become more important than ever. Vice President and Chief Economist for Export Development Canada...

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Diversity & Inclusion Drive Thought Provoking Discussion at CACC Boardroom Briefing

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Demonstrating its support for diversity and inclusion, CACC Corporate Sponsor MinterEllison held a boardroom briefing in Melbourne, entitled Leadership Diversity – from token to turning point. Distinguished guests included visiting CEO of Business Council of Canada, Goldy Hyder, both High Commissioners from Australia & Canada and various senior Australian & Canadian executives across all business sectors. CACC Director, Lesley Gillespie OAM, welcomed the President and CEO of Export Development Canada (EDC), Mairead Lavery as guest speaker to share her perspective on the topic as a business leader driving change. “As a young girl, I really remember thinking there wasn’t anything I couldn’t do if I worked for it. I really did see the world as a place of possibility,” she said. Despite being raised by a working-class family, and being female, Ms Lavery was determined to go to university, get a good job and make her mark on the world. Having grown up in Belfast, Northern Ireland, she knows all too well the consequences of not having an inclusive community. “Growing up in Belfast, I learnt the value of neighbours and community; it was a place where you could rely on your neighbours to help you do something and that really speaks to community and to diversity and inclusion. Those values have stayed with me and those lessons and values helped me make the decision to join EDC.” “EDC is a place where we really strive to have diversity and inclusion – diversity of thought, diversity of our employees, and we truly want our employees to reflect the diversity of our customers.” Ms Lavery said she was incredibly proud to be the first female CEO in the organisation’s 75-year history and was working hard to ensure better gender diversity across the organisation. “We have gender diversity at all levels across...

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Canada Appoints New High Commissioner for Canada in Australia

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The newly appointed High Commissioner for Canada, His Excellency Mark Glauser was excited to be back in Australia, a place he remembers fondly from his younger years. Hosted by the Canadian Australian Chamber of Commerce, the High Commissioner met with CACC members, sponsors and partners in Melbourne, hosted at PwC offices. [caption id="attachment_4259" align="aligncenter" width="2560"] MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA - DECEMBER 16 2019:CACC members reception at PWC on the 16th of December 2019 in Melbourne Australia. (Image/Martin Philbey)[/caption] He last visited Australia in 1987 as a backpacker, where he recalls attending a Billy Joel concert. Many things have changed in the 32 years since he last came down under. He said if you had asked him in 1987 who the big three powerhouses were, he would have said Ford, GM and Chrysler. But if you asked him today, he would say it is Facebook, Amazon and Google. “There are industries that are thriving today that didn’t exist in 1987,” Mr Glauser said. “In 2030 there are going to be companies that will be major influencers that don’t exist today, and maybe even industries that don’t exist today.” “This creates opportunities for businesses in Australia and Canada to capitalise on.” “You have to be agile enough to make the most of these opportunities. Smaller companies tend to be better at that than bigger companies.” Mr Glauser said he wanted to work with businesses to develop partnerships and maximise these business opportunities. “There is no better place to take advantage of these opportunities than through the Canada-Australia business partnership. I am delighted to be here to help make that happen and to walk that journey with you.” [caption id="attachment_4260" align="aligncenter" width="2560"] PICTURED (from left to right): Marc-Andre Hawkes, Consul & Senior Trade Commissioner - Canadian Consulate, Sydney, Melissa Wharton, CEO - CACC, H.E. Mark...

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The Rise of the Institutional Investor, a Canadian Australian Comparative

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PICTURED (from left): Doug Carmichael, CACC President, H.E. Natasha Smith, Australian High Commissioner to Canada, Minh Dao, KPMG Partner, Mairead Lavery, EDC President and Goldy Hyder, Business Council of Canada President.   Are Super Funds the Investment of the Future? On February 11, 2020 the Canadian Australian Chamber of Commerce (CACC) hosted a boardroom briefing, Rise of the Institutional Investor, a Canadian Australian Comparative. The event covered themes surrounding regulation & bureaucracy, environmental & social governance, and the flow of capital. CACC President, Doug Carmichael whom recently retired last year as CEO of Commbank Group Super facilitated the discussion with visiting guests Goldy Hyder, CEO of Business Council of Canada (BCC) and Mairead Lavery President of Export Development Canada (EDC). Opening remarks were made by Australian High Commissioner for Canada, Her Excellency Natasha Smith and the open discussion focussed on the trends changing the way in which asset owners are engaging with the corporate community both in Australia and in Canada.  Attendees included senior leaders from the Australian Superannuation Funds, Canadian Financial Services organisations, and industry stakeholders. The challenges Canadian investors are facing at home and the challenges Australian investors face when doing business in Canada were acknowledged, and a new scope surrounding the competitive landscape in Australia were discussed. Currently, co-investments between Canadian and Australian funds are rooted in infrastructure projects. However, there is room to grow for both countries to invest in mature development projects where better governance can be used to build stronger partnerships. Stakeholders Swati Dave, Managing Director of Export Finance and Insurance Corporation (EFIC) and Mairead Lavery, President of Export Development Canada (EDC) were also present in the discussion, to highlight how the two credit agencies work to support and develop trade between Canada, Australia and other global countries. Both parties aim to maintain competitive...

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Australia Day Celebrations in Toronto – “Australia is Open For Business”

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Australian expats, Torontonians and members of the business community came together at The Great Hall in downtown Toronto this month to celebrate Australia Day. Hosted by the Australian Government and supported by several Australian organizations including the Canadian Australian Chamber of Commerce, the event drew a large crowd reassured that Australia remains open for business and tourism despite the ongoing bushfire situation across several states. Opening remarks from the High Commissioner and Consulate General thanked Canadians for their ongoing support during the fires and emphasized that the country was still open for business, noting that the best support for Australians was to continue traveling, investing and doing business there. PICTURED (from left): Dr Grayson Perry, Consul General & Senior Trade and Investment Commissioner, Canada and H.E. Natasha Smith, Australian High Commissioner to Canada.   The event had an unquestionably distinct Aussie flair with guests enjoying classics including meat pies, sausage rolls, lamingtons and lamb while enjoying the best of Australian wines, music and imagery, including Paul Hogan advertisements. The message of tourism and business comes despite Tourism Australia pulling the ‘Matesong’ campaign in the UK featuring Kylie Minogue and Adam Hills due to the ongoing bush fires. With Australia still open for business, the Canadian Australian Chamber of Commerce can help facilitate conversations and provide support for Canadian businesses seeking to invest in Australia. Businesses, investors and entrepreneurial individuals can reach out to the Toronto Committee of the Chamber for additional information and support.   The Canadian Australian Chamber of Commerce (CACC) is a non-profit, volunteer based organisation that aims to bring businesses together to facilitate a strong environment for economic trade and investment between Canada and Australia.  Written by Anthony Naimo CACC Member Engagement Committee 

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Australian films shine at Toronto International Film Festival

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The Toronto International Film Festival, better known as TIFF, was celebrated in Canada’s biggest city. Starting on September 5, the festival brought together film makers, producers, actors, celebrities and film enthusiasts to discover the latest cinematic releases from across North America, Europe, Asia and Australia.  Over its 43-year history, TIFF has grown to become one of the largest, most influential and highly attended film festivals in the world, sitting alongside Cannes, Venice and Berlin in stature.  Australian cinema is well represented at TIFF 2019 with no less than six feature length films including Black Bitch, Dirt Music, Hearts and Bones, I Am Woman, The Australian Dream and True History of the Kelly Gang, based on Peter Carey’s successful novel of the same name. The Australian High Commission together with Screen Australia brought together Australian film makers, expats, producers and actors on Sunday September 8 to celebrate the release of the six feature films and Australian cinema.  Held at Cube Nightclub on Toronto’s trendy Queen West, the event was an opportunity to connect, network and celebrate the achievements in Australian cinema.  Actors Hugo Weaving, Deborah Mailman, Essie Davis were in attendance promoting their films while former Sydney Swans footballer Adam Goodes and journalist Stan Grant were there promoting their documentary feature – The Australian Dream. CACC members from the Toronto Committee were also in attendance to promote and discuss the opportunities for available to Australian and Canadian film makers and producers to work in the respective countries. Both Australia and Canada offer spectacular film locations, incentives and opportunities for entrepreneurial film makers.   The Canadian Australian Chamber of Commerce (CACC) is a non-profit, volunteer based organisation that aims to bring businesses together to facilitate a strong environment for economic trade and investment between Canada and Australia.    Written by Anthony Naimo   CACC...

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Navigating With A Mentor

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  Make the most of your gap year and working-holiday by gaining international professional experience. By taking part in CAMP (Canadian Australian Mentoring Program), you will develop on both a professional and a personal level, which can lead to greater career prospects. The possibilities are endless and it's all about what you will make of your Overseas Experience. With CAMP, you can get some guidance on the local job market and career pathways. Workplaces in other countries may be very different to the one you are familiar with back home. Through CAMP you will have the opportunity to connect with local professionals, have meaningful intercultural experiences, and gain new perspectives. It will help you navigate sometimes tricky dialect differences, accents or cultures. Even if both countries speak the same language, you may find that there are differences between what a phrase means at home and what it means in the country you are visiting. It's also important to understand nuances in workplace attitudes. A mentor can help you with this as they help you navigate a sometimes tricky workplace culture. So if you're coming to Sydney, NSW from Sydney, Nova Scotia you might find things easier if you have the support of a trusty mentor. To participate in CACC’s Mentoring Pilot Program, powered by Thread, please email your expression of interest to mentoring@cacc.com.au – please state in subject line if you are a Mentor or Mentee. (Photo: Destination NSW)

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4 Fast Facts About the CPTPP

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The end of 2018 saw Canada enter the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) with six nations across the Asia-Pacific region. The agreement is expected to inject millions into the economies of both Australia and Canada, along with the other nations entered into the partnership. Austrade, the Australian Government's trade, investment and education promotion body, highlights some quick statistics on the free trade agreement. Fact #1 Australia maintains 11 free trade agreements with 18 countries including the CPTPP and the ASEAN agreements. Australia’s FTAs are held with Canada, New Zealand, Singapore, the United States, Thailand, Chile, Malaysia, South Korea, Japan, Indonesia, the Philippines, Brunei, Vietnam, Laos, Myanmar, Cambodia, Mexico and Peru. Fact #2 Australia exports $87.9b to the CPTPP countries. Of that amount, Australia exports approximately $2.7b to Canada. Australian exports to Japan amount to $44.6b. Fact #3 Goods exports that result from the CPTPP include sheep, wine, sugar, beef, horticulture, dairy, grains and cereals, iron and steel, iron ore, copper, nickel, seafood, rice and processed foods. Additionally, services exported as a result of the agreement will include telecommunications, mining, energy, finance, e-commerce, education and professional services. Fact #4 In 2017-2018, 25.3 percent (A$79.6b) of Australia’s goods exports and 20.9 percent (A$18.4b) of Australia’s services exports went to CPTPP nations. According to 2018 ABS trade data, goods and services exports to CPTPP countries equated to around 22.7 percent of Australia’s total goods and services exports.   The Canadian Australian Chamber of Commerce (CACC) is a non-profit, volunteer based organisation that aims to bring businesses together to facilitate a strong environment for economic trade and investment between Canada and Australia.    Written by Anthony Naimo   CACC Communications Committee 

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