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Resource Efficiencies: How Australia & Canada are Embracing Innovative Business Solutions
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4 fast facts about the CPTPP

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The end of 2018 saw Canada enter the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) with six nations across the Asia-Pacific region. The agreement is expected to inject millions into the economies of both Australia and Canada, along with the other nations entered into the partnership. Austrade, the Australian Government's trade, investment and education promotion body, highlights some quick statistics on the free trade agreement. Fact #1 Australia maintains 11 free trade agreements with 18 countries including the CPTPP and the ASEAN agreements. Australia’s FTAs are held with Canada, New Zealand, Singapore, the United States, Thailand, Chile, Malaysia, South Korea, Japan, Indonesia, the Philippines, Brunei, Vietnam, Laos, Myanmar, Cambodia, Mexico and Peru. Fact #2 Australia exports $87.9b to the CPTPP countries. Of that amount, Australia exports approximately $2.7b to Canada. Australian exports to Japan amount to $44.6b. Fact #3 Goods exports that result from the CPTPP include sheep, wine, sugar, beef, horticulture, dairy, grains and cereals, iron and steel, iron ore, copper, nickel, seafood, rice and processed foods. Additionally, services exported as a result of the agreement will include telecommunications, mining, energy, finance, e-commerce, education and professional services. Fact #4 In 2017-2018, 25.3 percent (A$79.6b) of Australia’s goods exports and 20.9 percent (A$18.4b) of Australia’s services exports went to CPTPP nations. According to 2018 ABS trade data, goods and services exports to CPTPP countries equated to around 22.7 percent of Australia’s total goods and services exports.   The Canadian Australian Chamber of Commerce (CACC) is a non-profit, volunteer based organisation that aims to bring businesses together to facilitate a strong environment for economic trade and investment between Canada and Australia.    Written by Anthony Naimo   CACC Communications Committee 

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Collaboration is Key to Australian and Canadian Universities

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The benefits of collaboration between Australian and Canadian universities was the focus of a recent breakfast, organised by the Canadian Australian Chamber of Commerce, in partnership with Queens College, at the University of Melbourne.   The breakfast featured President and Vice Chancellor of the University of Victoria, Jamie Cassels QC, discussing the importance of collaboration with Australians. Professor Cassels, and his delegation, recently finished a tour of Australia focused on developing partnerships with universities, governments, and industry. The breakfast was part of the CACC’s ongoing efforts (https://cacc.com.au/news/what-the-nhl-can-teach-australians-about-diversity/) to improve connections between Canada and Australia across all economic sectors, including higher education. Canadian universities are key partners for Australian Universities. For example, Monash University (my school) has a strong relationship with the University of British Columbia, and the University of New South Wales works closely with the University of Toronto.   “Australia and Canada have two of the best university systems in the world and have similar foundations,” said Stewart Gill OAM, Master of Queens College. Professor Gill has been a long-time champion of efforts to improve collaboration between the two countries, and was recently appointed as Ambassador to Australia for the Association of Commonwealth Universities.   “There is much to be gained in terms of fostering student mobility and research projects particularly in areas of common interest in peace and reconciliation, gender issues and climate change,” Prof Gill continued. “There is also much to be learned through sharing best practice, creating new joint programs and sharing curricula through Australian-Canadian partnerships and forums in which institutional knowledge and resources can be shared and multiplied.” Attendees at the breakfast, representing most of the major universities in Melbourne, heard about University of Victoria’s particular expertise in research on aboriginal and indigenous cultures (https://www.uvic.ca/research/learnabout/home/strengths/indigenous/index.php). Researchers are working with Indigenous communities and organisations in Canada...

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Boardroom Briefings by the Australian High Commissioner to Canada, Her Excellency Natasha Smith

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The CACC was proud to welcome the Australian High Commissioner to Canada, Her Excellency Natasha Smith, to boardroom briefings in Sydney and Melbourne to discuss the bilateral relationship between Australia and Canada, especially trade and investment.  She highlighted the key features of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) and its benefits for Australian and Canadian businesses. Her Excellency said the connection between the two countries was strong and deep.  The first ever Canadian Trade Commissioner arrived in Sydney in 1895, and 2020 would mark 80 years of having High Commissioners in both countries. PICTURED: H.E. Natasha Smith with Mike McGrath, Managing Partner CMO for PwC. The bilateral trade and investment relationship is also strong and enduring.  But despite this, the CPTPP was the first full free trade agreement struck between the two counties. “The CPTPP is the ‘gold standard’ of trade agreements,” she said. Quoting Jim Carr, the Canadian Minister of International Trade Diversification, Her Excellency described the trade agreement as a bridge that governments build and then it was up to individual businesses to use the bridge. She said the CPTPP opened up new opportunities for businesses across the 11 countries that were part of the agreement. “The agreement provides significant tariff reductions and eliminations that will benefit Australian businesses. Beef is a key example, within five years all tariffs on Australian beef into Canada will be eliminated and wine tariffs have already disappeared with ratification.” Her Excellency said one of the biggest advantages to the agreement was the freer flow of people between the countries to support business growth, through temporary entry commitments. PICTURED: Jack Cowin - CACC Patron, Angela Bogdan - Consul General of Canada to Australia, H.E. Natasha Smith, Minh Dao - Co-Chair CACC Events Committee and Doug Carmichael - CACC President. “I personally...

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