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Lea Pfeiffer

Australian films shine at Toronto International Film Festival

By | News

The Toronto International Film Festival, better known as TIFF, was celebrated in Canada’s biggest city. Starting on September 5, the festival brought together film makers, producers, actors, celebrities and film enthusiasts to discover the latest cinematic releases from across North America, Europe, Asia and Australia.  Over its 43-year history, TIFF has grown to become one of the largest, most influential and highly attended film festivals in the world, sitting alongside Cannes, Venice and Berlin in stature.  Australian cinema is well represented at TIFF 2019 with no less than six feature length films including Black Bitch, Dirt Music, Hearts and Bones, I Am Woman, The Australian Dream and True History of the Kelly Gang, based on Peter Carey’s successful novel of the same name. The Australian High Commission together with Screen Australia brought together Australian film makers, expats, producers and actors on Sunday September 8 to celebrate the release of the six feature films and Australian cinema.  Held at Cube Nightclub on Toronto’s trendy Queen West, the event was an opportunity to connect, network and celebrate the achievements in Australian cinema.  Actors Hugo Weaving, Deborah Mailman, Essie Davis were in attendance promoting their films while former Sydney Swans footballer Adam Goodes and journalist Stan Grant were there promoting their documentary feature – The Australian Dream. CACC members from the Toronto Committee were also in attendance to promote and discuss the opportunities for available to Australian and Canadian film makers and producers to work in the respective countries. Both Australia and Canada offer spectacular film locations, incentives and opportunities for entrepreneurial film makers. The Canadian Australian Chamber of Commerce (CACC) is a non-profit, volunteer based organisation that aims to bring businesses together to facilitate a strong environment for economic trade and investment between Canada and Australia.    Written by Anthony Naimo   CACC Communications...

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4 fast facts about the CPTPP

By | News

The end of 2018 saw Canada enter the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) with six nations across the Asia-Pacific region. The agreement is expected to inject millions into the economies of both Australia and Canada, along with the other nations entered into the partnership. Austrade, the Australian Government's trade, investment and education promotion body, highlights some quick statistics on the free trade agreement. Fact #1 Australia maintains 11 free trade agreements with 18 countries including the CPTPP and the ASEAN agreements. Australia’s FTAs are held with Canada, New Zealand, Singapore, the United States, Thailand, Chile, Malaysia, South Korea, Japan, Indonesia, the Philippines, Brunei, Vietnam, Laos, Myanmar, Cambodia, Mexico and Peru. Fact #2 Australia exports $87.9b to the CPTPP countries. Of that amount, Australia exports approximately $2.7b to Canada. Australian exports to Japan amount to $44.6b. Fact #3 Goods exports that result from the CPTPP include sheep, wine, sugar, beef, horticulture, dairy, grains and cereals, iron and steel, iron ore, copper, nickel, seafood, rice and processed foods. Additionally, services exported as a result of the agreement will include telecommunications, mining, energy, finance, e-commerce, education and professional services. Fact #4 In 2017-2018, 25.3 percent (A$79.6b) of Australia’s goods exports and 20.9 percent (A$18.4b) of Australia’s services exports went to CPTPP nations. According to 2018 ABS trade data, goods and services exports to CPTPP countries equated to around 22.7 percent of Australia’s total goods and services exports.   The Canadian Australian Chamber of Commerce (CACC) is a non-profit, volunteer based organisation that aims to bring businesses together to facilitate a strong environment for economic trade and investment between Canada and Australia.    Written by Anthony Naimo   CACC Communications Committee 

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What the NHL can teach Australians about diversity

By | News

Did you know the NHL is a world leader in efforts to end homophobia in in sport?  Perhaps even more surprising, hockey’s leadership is largely due to the work of hockey hard-man Brian Burke and his family (Burke is Canada’s politer version of Australia’s Eddie McGuire). The former Maple Leafs and Calgary Flames executive, and his son Patrick, helped found an organisation called You Can Play after Brian’s other son died in a car accident. Brendan Burke was gay and never felt welcome in hockey.  Since 2012, You Can Play has become the world leader in efforts to promote the inclusion of LGBT+ people in sport. On a recent tour of Australia, they shared their secrets around how they inspired the NHL to lead. The visit was organised by the CACC in partnership with the Canadian Government, as well as, Monash University, NAB, Salesforce, and Amnesty International. You Can Play’s tour was designed to inspire Australians, particularly our major sport organisations, and shift the thinking that Australians are doing enough to combat discrimination in sport.  The contrast between Australia and Canada is stark This year every NHL team held LGBT+ Pride events (e.g. Pride Nights) and many teams also sent players to march in local Pride Parades. The NHL’s leadership has inspired other leagues, including Major League Baseball and the NBA, to also join the Pride party. In contrast, just one Australian professional male sport league (AFL) and one team (either St Kilda or Sydney Swans) hold annual Pride Games. Participation in Mardi Gras has also been limited.  During the Australian tour, You Can Play’s team spoke to nearly 300 sport leaders, government officials, and LGBT community leaders at events, meetings, and seminars, including training sessions in Sydney hosted by Cricket Australia/NSW and in Melbourne hosted by Rugby Australia/Victoria, such...

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Understanding the CPTPP agreement and what it means for Canada & Australia

By | News

On December 30, 2018 Canada entered into the widely discussed Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) along with six other nations within the Asia-Pacific region. The trade agreement, once fully implemented, will bring together approximately 500 million people from across 11 nations including Australia, Brunei, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore and Vietnam, to provide preferential access to markets across four continents.  In both Canada and Australia, there has been extensive discussion among business operators, the media and the general public about the trade agreement and its impact on Canadian and Australian businesses. But what does the trade agreement actually mean for the citizens of these 11 countries? How will it change the way we do business or invest? And, specifically, what does it mean for both Australia and Canada – two countries with uncannily similar histories, growth and cultures despite the oceanic distance?  Tell me simply, what does the agreement do? In simple terms, through the agreement, trade and investment rules are simplified to ensure trade is fairer, more predictable and helps reduce the number of logistic resources required. The agreement seeks to offer foreign direct investors enhanced protection, predictability and transparency for their investments. The agreement also provides greater access to fast growing markets across the four continents – North America, South America, Asia and Australia. So, what does the agreement mean for Australia and Canada? Canada itself has accomplished a significant feat as a result of entering into the CPTPP agreement. Canada is believed to be the only G7 nation with free trade access across the Americas, Europe and the Asia-Pacific region, putting it in a truly unique place on the global stage when it comes to trade and investment. From a Canadian perspective, the agreement is expected to inject $4.2 billion into...

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